• Ancestral Constellations

    Ancestral in the Constellation

    Making Sense of the Ancestors Little has been researched or written about the ‘Ancestral’ aspect of constellations theory and practice.   After more than seven years of learning this approach and travelling my own healing path, I have understood as a woman of African heritage that I have to step out and step up.  That means naming what this work is from an African perspective, the ‘Call’ to the Ancestral path. When you follow the path of African spirituality and ancestral work you come to realise that our ancestors are with us in the living world.  We remember them and in African cosmology, we honour them.  Just as many people in the West do when they visit their family members graves and talk to them, what is the difference? AWAKEN to Your Heritage! If you look at a ‘Call’ to ancestral practice as an awakening to your ancestral heritage, it…

  • Ancestral Constellations

    Family Research a Systemic Lens

    Start before it’s too Late! We often only start family research later in our lives.  Maybe we take for granted the cultural traditions that we grew up around.  We may have embraced them or thought that they were old-fashioned and not worth paying attention to. Later in life, as ageing parents come closer to the ‘transition’ we are forced to look at what is being left behind and how connected we are to our ancestral past.  Reconnecting to your family heritage, its ancestral heartland and cultural traditions can be a wonderful way to honour, those who have gone before us and those that we are still in a relationship with. A Growing Desire for Knowledge This aim to reconnect with family members across generations and within the wider community of which they are a part is a common and growing phenomenon.  It points to the part of our life or…

  • Ancestral Constellations

    Journey into African Centred Therapy

    Why Black People Don’t go to Therapy There is a perception that black people don’t want to go to therapy or counselling.  It is true that they go in smaller numbers.  And it is also true that many therapeutic interventions are not culturally relevant, so people turn to the church, or an elder to support them through family difficulties. And as a community, we worry about ‘washing our dirty linen in public’ or are concerned about ‘what other people think of us’.  Often the impetus for a person to do something about their ‘life-issue’ happens when there is a family or community crisis. I see my approach to constellations work as a kind of ‘walk-into’ African centred therapeutic space.  It can act as a snapshot, a moment to explore and dive deep, a way of reflecting on something profound and troubling, without an ongoing commitment.  In a way, it can…