• Ancestral Constellations

    The ‘Power’ in the Letter

    If you don’t ask you can’t find out what you need to know! The ‘Power’ was in the Letter When I read the letter and took it to Guyana, I had a better idea about why I was researching my family heritage. And what I was seeking to find out about my ancestral identity. Back in 1979 my mother wrote to her favourite brother Eustace and asked for more details about their family heritage. My mother’s memory is poor now so I can’t ask her why she did that, but I can only guess that she was homesick and wanted something to remind her of her heritage? Or maybe because she didn’t grow up with her siblings she was looking to reconnect? Details of Family Unknown! For whatever reason, he wrote back and gave her details about their maternal and paternal ancestry, back to their grandparents and great-grandparents.   I…

  • Ancestral Constellations

    A Healing Ritual for Grief

    Life in Birth and Death Last Thursday it was both my 59th Birthday and the one year passing of my father.  It was a poignant day, full of bittersweet memories of what I have been gifted from my father and the recognition that I won’t see him again, at least in this lifetime. But he is on my ancestral altar and I talk to him constantly.  Those of us born and living in the African Diaspora who are RE-Membering, know that our ancestors walk by our side.  They are with us daily, we honour and respect them, we feed and water them. On the Ancestral Path For the past seven years I have been on an ancestral journey, it started long ago, but the day that I stepped into my first Family Constellations workshop I knew that I was witnessing an African Healing Ritual.  Since that day I have been…

  • Ancestral Constellations

    Black Salt at Tate Liverpool

    Black Salt at Tate Liverpool Liverpool International Slavery Museum Exhibition November 2018 Lives of Britains Black Sailors I was so lucky to see this exhibition a few months ago, it stories a part of British and African and Caribbean history that is little told.  The exhibition was held in Liverpool at the Tate Liverpool.   It proved to be a fitting place to hold it with its history and location as a slave port and there was relevance for my journey, both personal and professional. And to be honest I was surprised and delighted by the exhibition, a small glimpse into past and present history. The following text is taken from the Tata Liverpool’s website Black Salt: Britain’s Black sailors revealed the contribution Black seafarers have made to some of the most significant maritime events of the past 500 years. The exhibition was based on the book ‘Black Salt: Seafarers of African…